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Photo of Senator Carlo Leone.

STATE SENATOR

Carlo Leone

Integrity & Collaboration

Honor Your Health Next Weekend!

I hope you'll make some time next weekend to attend the "Honor Your Health 2018" family health fair scheduled for 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. next Saturday, October 13, 2018, in the Deloitte Building, 695 East Main Street in Stamford.

health care symbols.

The health fair, presented by the Hispanic Advisory Council of Greater Stamford, will provide medical screenings like flu shots, blood pressure, and cholesterol screening, and feature face painting, music, free food, and fun activities for children.

For more information, please call 203-984-9970 or visit www.stamfordhealthfair.com.
 

Be Wary of Used Car Purchases After Floods and Hurricanes

As Co-Chairman of the legislature's Transportation Committee, big issues like infrastructure (roads and bridges) is always an important topic. But a motorist's knowledge about their own car or truck is also vitally important.

After all the rain, hurricanes, and floods that America has experienced this year, there are probably some very questionable used cars on the market, put there by sellers trying to recoup their flood losses. You work hard for your money, so please be aware of exactly what you're buying before your next used vehicle purchase.

flood image.

Consumer Reports magazine recently published a very comprehensive "how-to" article on avoiding the purchase of one of these rain-soaked vehicles; a summary of some of their suggestions can be found online.

Flood-damaged cars are often transported well beyond their original region after major storms to locations where consumers may be less aware of what warning signs to look for.

Water can ruin electronics, lubricants, and mechanical systems. It may take months or years, but corrosion can find its way to the car's vital electronics, including airbag controllers.

Once a flood car is totaled, it's supposed to get a new title, called a salvage title. Those titles are usually marked with the word "salvage" or "flood." But in some states, this warning is shown on the title as an obscure letter or number code. Be especially wary of any used car being offered with a "lost" title or with only a bill of sale.

Water damage can be hard to detect, but Consumer Reports suggests looking for telltale signs, such as moldy or muddy carpeting; brand-new carpet in an older car; a visible waterline in the headlamps; rust around the seat mounting brackets or screws.